Glycerin

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Glycerin has always been one of those tricky ingredients for vegetarians because it’s included in so many consumer products and can be either plant or animal derived. One of those items where you’ll frequently find glycerin is toothpaste. So, I wrote to Crest to ask them whether their glycerin comes from. The basic answer (it can come from either, whatever’s more available) didn’t surprised me, but some of the other information in their response did:

Hi Ryan,

Crest Cavity Protection versions (Regular Paste, Cool Mint Gel, Icy Mint Striped and Kid’s Sparkle) don’t have glycerin, so they don’t contain animal by-products. Other versions of Crest contain glycerin which may be derived from vegetable or animal sources.

To assure yourself, we suggest checking the ingredient statement on Crest before you buy it. If glycerin isn’t listed, the Crest version contains no animal by-products. If glycerin is listed, it may be derived synthetically from either vegetable or animal sources, depending on which type is available at the time we buy it. If it’s made from animal sources, it may come from either beef or pork. There’s no way we can determine which form is in any particular package. However, any animal by-product used is chemically altered during manufacture and no longer resembles the original substance by the time it’s added to our product. Currently, we are in the process of converting to purely vegetable sources.

If religious beliefs, dietary preferences or medical conditions prevent your using products containing animal ingredients, share this information with your physician, dentist, minister, or rabbi. This person can better decide if you can use our product.

Hope this is helpful.

Barb
Crest Team

While I couldn’t care less if the product is “chemically altered” and “no longer resembles the original substance,” I was pleased to see that Crest is “in the process of converting to purely vegetable sources.” Good stuff and I hope they note that on their label when the time comes.

50 Responses to “Glycerin”

  1. pleather

    It seems that glycerin is in just about every lotion, hair care product, etc. that I find, and it is an extremely annoying ingredient. I use some Aveda products, which does usually note if the glycerin comes from a plant source, but some of their products don’t list the source. I’ll have to call and find out about those products, unless someone already knows about them.

    I had no idea about the toothpaste. Thanks for the heads up.

  2. tanvi

    wow i never even *thought* about toothpaste having animal by-products! thanks for the post.

  3. sue

    Glad you wrote the company and got the info. Is there any resourse on the web that one can find out which products are vegan? Perhaps some messageboard? A lot of products in the market have ingredients like glycerin that can come from animal or veg sources. My most hated ingredient is “natural flavorings”, which also can be either and is used all to often. I would love to know which product are vegan without writing to every single company. Any ideas out there?

  4. beth

    hey guys, i’m new to this site and kind of surprised to see y’all discussing Crest’s ingredients!! you can’t use Crest! it’s a Proctor & Gamble product and P & G are one of the most notorious animal testers in the game. Try Tom’s of Maine or Nature’s Gate or any of the other vegan and ethical brands out there. there are tons! if you must have flouride, fear not, tom’s has got it, and if you need whitening, JASON’s got it covered. For a list of more products that as a vegan you really ought to be boycotting, and more info on why, visit: http://www.pandgkills.com/cf.html

    if these items are not sold in your town, they are available on the web!

  5. Ryan

    Hi, nameless, welcome.

    hey guys, i’m new to this site and kind of surprised to see y’all discussing Crest’s ingredients!!

    It’s not just about patronizing the companies we believe in, but it’s also about working to get the larger mainstream companies to change their policy. If they know that people are asking about animal ingredients, animal testing, etc. then they’re going to make an effort to change.

  6. J

    Hi people. I just wanted to make a quick comment on some of the above.

    First, when the Crest representative wrote, “any animal by-product used is chemically altered during manufacture and no longer resembles the original substance by the time it’s added to our product,” it was 100% true. The glycerin that is used from animal and from plant is the exact same. In fact, toothpaste glycerin is no more animal than your average vegetable grown from the earth and dead animals that decomposed there hundreds of years ago. Their use of animal fat to get glycerin is akin to nature’s use of animal material to grow plants. In my scientific opinion, a boycott of Crest, or any other glycerin user, is a bit of a stretch. For one, we cannot know if the glycerin source is animal or vegetable to begin with. Regardless, it’s just a molecule in the end. Boycotting mother nature for her use of decomposed life would yield the same result.

    Secondly, the last quote said, “It’s not just about patronizing the companies we believe in”. I think you meant to say ‘patronizing the companies we DON’T believe in” or “patronizing the companies who don’t practice our beliefs”. Either way, it does sound a bit like imposing personal ideas on others. I don’t mean to go so far as to call vegetarianism a religion, though it is a valid part of many. But in the US, people are allowed to believe as they want, and conduct business under those beliefs. It sounds a bit militant and oppressive to say you will boycott these companies because they don’t follow your beliefs.

    You also mention, “If they know that people are asking about animal ingredients, animal testing, etc. then they’re going to make an effort to change.” They will change if the customer is willing to pay more for the increased cost of the product. They are a business, and can’t increase their production costs without increasing the price of their goods. Now they have the most optimum setup: purchase the cheapest bulk of glycerin – animal or vegetable source – to make cosmetics. Requesting a specific source (a specialized demand) increases market costs. Many organic products cost more for this reason. Some smaller companies are okay with the risk, and value organic policies over profit. But larger companies, like Crest, have a great deal to lose with such a change, including millions in stockholders’ investments.

    The question I guess is where do you draw the line on asking for change. Glycerin is a chemical compound. It is derived from both animal and plant fat, but is part of neither living animal nor living plant.

    I’m currently overseas, and read an interesting comment by someone who had studied in the US. He wrote that American’s are extreme in everything. They’re the only people who cannot be content as a vegetarian, but must convince everyone else to follow in the same. There are millions of devout vegans around the world, none of whom fight for political and economic changes over their religious and dietary beliefs. It seems a fury of the New World.

    I would like to conclude by saying that I am American, and though I am not a vegetarian, my mother and many friends are. I fully respect them, and I try to make sure they get enough protein, but we do not force each other to change.

  7. Rob

    Glycerine is just one issue with Crest. Note that it is made by Procter and Gamble who do considerable animal testing. Many vegans, including myself, boycott all P&G products as a means of protesting vivisection.

  8. Brian

    While glycerin may be of animal or vegetable source, I always assume it is made of petrochemicals unless it says otherwise. If it is vegetable source, it will always list it as such, but either animal or petrochemical source will be listed as just glycerin. A few years ago, at least, it was generally cheaper made of petrochemicals I think, but perhaps with the rise in costs maybe less of it is now this source. Just being curious, do y’all have objections to eating petrochemical source glycerin in foods?

  9. Wayne

    I found this website interesting, as I recently found out I am deathly allergic to any form of glycerin, glycol, and PEG. Unfortunately after 8 years of being completed diasbled by this, landing up in the ER too many times to count, and having to use an Epi-Pen on more than one occasion, they at least finally believe I am allergic to glycerin. IT took seeing 4 different allergist and a top teaching institution in the area….and none of them initially believed it was possible to be allergic to glycerin, and finally two of allergists tested me with a 50%glycerin and 50% saline solution injected SC under my skin, and within 5 minutes my arm was red, swollen, numb, and of course itchy. It has been such a horrible calamity of events. So, if you ever test positve to glycerin as an allergen do not let any one tell you or make you believe it is all in your head…especially if you have a positive scratch test confonfirming that you are positive to glycerin as an allergen. Because the one thing I have learned is you have to be your best advocate.
    However the challange is now, because I am the first person that any of these doctors have seen allergic to glycerin…and I live in a pretty big decent size city in Northern California, that they have no idea what to do, and as you know pretty much if you read labels and you can assume that glycerin or a derivative is contained in 995 of what we breathe, eat, touch, put on ourselves, or injest…again it is about 99% of products made by humans….and I mean everything…

  10. J

    Wow Wayne, the doctors must certainly be baffled with that one. I’ve never heard of anything like that either. The thing is, when your body burns fat, it breaks it down into fatty acids and glycerol (same as glycerine). That means every time you use fat as energy, you put this chemical in your blood. What’s most remarkable is that the heart runs ENTIRELY on fat for energy (no sugars or starches). Therefore, every time your heart beats, it does so by creating glycerine and fatty acids. Every time your heart beats, it puts this “poison” into your bloodstream. This is why the doctors don’t understand your allergy. It sounds like it would have killed you before birth if it were true. If not, the many soaps, toothpastes, oils, and lotions you have used would have caused serious trouble. Is there ANY other possible cause for your reactions? Any chemical similar to glycerine, but slightly altered? The doctors should be able to check for that. Good luck and I hope you find a solution!

  11. Grace

    I am so excited to see that people are paying attention to this stuff about glycerin. I am a district manager consultant for Arbonne International which uses only vegtable fat. Besides crest which I never knew about almost all skin care products use this. And who knows if it is animal or vegtable! I feel they need to list this. But if anyone is interested Arbonne uses NO animal by products or mineral oil. I am glad people are caring about this. Pleaseeeeeeeeee let me know if you want to know more about Arbonne!!!!

  12. C

    I am also allergic to glycerin, I react internally and externally. I went for allergy testing and they inject you with glycerin as the control and boy was I sick! I have to be very careful but it is difficult because alot of products will not disclose their ingredients because of “trade secrest”. Eating out is a task, glycerin is EVERYTHING from peanut butter, shortening, your couch, car, clothing, medicines, shampoos,lotions. Glycerin is used as a softener/anticaking agent. My doctor is so baffled, he has told me other doctors don’t believe him.

  13. dalida

    As far as glycerine in foods– is there no way one can find out if it is vegetable or animal-derived? This is a bit frustrating

  14. Megan

    honeslty, if i were you i wouldn’t even be BUYING crest products. they’re owned by protor and gamble who test on animals so whether or not the toothpaste has glycerin in it, it’s still not vegan…

  15. Anya

    i am a bit surprised that some doctors don’t believe in glycerin allergies. it seems like it’s a common thing at my doctor’s office — i’ve seen quite a few people getting their glycerin drops before shots (to neutralize glycerin in the serum)… in fact, i am one of them… i was very sad when i first found out about my allergy, because (like you said) glycerin is in everything… but i am also allergic to soy… you just learn to live with it — reading labels carefully, etc… thanks for sharing about crest products (i couldn’t find any info on their web site).

  16. ss

    I came across these postings doing a web-search, and I just wanted to respond to J’s comments about Americans being extreme and the point of view that we “force” everyone to adopt our views. As a vegetarian myself (for almost 20 years), I do want people to understand the “why” of making choices – it’s not about “forcing” them to do the same, but making sure they have the resources to be AWARE of the fact that our choices have consequences, and that if they do not believe in the options currently available, there are alternatives. I firmly believe that everyone should make their own choices, but they should know WHY they are making them — if more information about the products that we use were made available, and products were less marketed for money than for benefits and usefulness, then I believe more people would be making different choices. As a minority (and yes, I consider vegetarians / vegans a minority group), it is difficult to have a voice in a society that accepts the majority as the “status quo” – only society can change that, therefore, it is reasonable to expect that society will need to understand what they are choosing before they change their choices. Some approaches that individuals take to contributing to the awareness can be considered extreme, and as a minority group, it is often necessary to be aggressive in encouraging change, but I would hope that is not taken as being “forceful”. If creating awareness is viewed as “forcing” others to adopt our views then I take issue with the person feeling “forced”. As J mentioned, it is about respecting choices, but you cannot fully respect something unless you first understand it.

  17. Lila

    Does anyone have some answers to how to avoid glycerin or a list of things that glycerin is in? Or a list of alternate names for glycerin (glycol, etc..??). It is a very scary allergy to have and I’m apparently not avoiding it as much as I’d like because my symptom (sudden air hunger, shortness of breath to point of light-headedness) is still very prevalent. I’m also allergic or sensitive to many foods, including gluten and have cut all of them out of my diet for a couple of months now. I think it’s the glycerin I’m continuing to encounter (I registered an 11 on skin test for glycerin.).
    Any advice anyone can send my way would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much.

  18. cecilia

    Glycerin is also known as glycerine and glycerol, and it’s chemical name includes 1,2,3-propanetriol, 1,2,3-trihydroxypropane, glyceritol, and glycyl alcohol.

    My skin, especially my face, is allergic to glycerin too. I haven’t found any lotion that doesn’t contain glycerin. Does any of you come across with a face moisturizer that doesn’t contain glycerin and is not for oily skin?

  19. Kevin

    I am impressed with your diligence in finding appropriate answers. Glycerine is indeed a tricky ingredient for many vegans, as many other additives allowed by the FDA, currently calculated at over 3,000 have not been named or mentioned in most “ingredient lists.”

    In addition to total respect for animal rights, I am sure that you know this; but fluroide (in water) is outlawed in all countries but 3; the US, UK, and Ireland. During WW II, Nazi researchers noticed that prisoners drinking flouridated water were much more compliant and obediant. This, after, the Russians further explored this, was due to the fact that flouride interrupts the independent thinking process of the brain. Flouride also has also been proven to soften the inner tooth canal, adding to tooth sensitivity and not helping towards cavities in the long run.

    Propolis (natural antifungal/antibacterial derived from bees), ginger, peppermint, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and baking soda are the only proven tooth cleaners. In fact, history has shown that people had whiter and cleaner teeth when they brushed with baking soda and rinsed with 3% hydrogen peroxide, along with proper flossing, of course.

    Additionally, I want to add even more importantly is the fact that Crest adds artifical sweetener (Aspartame) to its complex compound conglomeration of “propreitory ingredients.” Aspartame, Nutrisweet, Splenda, Sugartwin, etc. all contain heavy doses of formaldehyde. This is a known carcinogen that is used for embalming people. Both flouride and Aspartame are extremely hard on the immune system. Environmental illness is on a heavy rise, and it is heavily suppressd due to the fact that no company can profit from heavy capitolism caused illnsees. One must virtually live like a cave man to recover, with natural medicine; this equals little profit. The pharmaceutical industry makes billions of dollars from both of these products and everyone should know neither one of these are in their best interest. If you read about Donald Rumslfeld and how he passed Aspartame on the market due to his link with the pharmaceutical industry, perhaps you will understand why this is a public disgrace.

    In all actuality, there are much cheaper, safer substances to use that the public is left privey to. It is sad to see so many trusting people, and I think you are smarter than this.

    We deal with people who are environmentally ill every day. They complain of of frequent headaches, short-term memory, acid reflux, sinus problems, digestive problems, muscle pain and breathing difficulties. Most prescription drugs only address the symptoms, not treat the illness. Again, a toxic society cannot heal from chemicals, and little money is to be made elsewhere. Be careful what you put in your body. . . And the air you breathe. You might be shocked at what you see. We prefer to find solutions.

    Kindest regards,
    Kevin
    Mold Help Organization
    http://www.mold-help.org

  20. Susan

    I am impressed with your diligence in finding appropriate answers. Glycerine is indeed a tricky ingredient for many vegans, as many other additives allowed by the FDA, currently calculated at over 3,000 have not been named or mentioned in most “ingredient lists.”

    In addition to total respect for animal rights, I am sure that you know this; but fluroide (in water) is outlawed in all countries but 3; the US, UK, and Ireland. During WW II, Nazi researchers noticed that prisoners drinking flouridated water were much more compliant and obediant. This, after, the Russians further explored this, was due to the fact that flouride interrupts the independent thinking process of the brain. Flouride also has also been proven to soften the inner tooth canal, adding to tooth sensitivity and not helping towards cavities in the long run.

    Propolis (natural antifungal/antibacterial derived from bees), ginger, peppermint, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and baking soda are the only proven tooth cleaners. In fact, history has shown that people had whiter and cleaner teeth when they brushed with baking soda and rinsed with 3% hydrogen peroxide.

    Additionally, I want to add even more importantly is the fact that Crest adds artifical sweetener (Aspartame) to its complex compound conglomeration of “propreitory ingredients.” Aspartame, Nutrisweet, Splenda, Sugartwin, etc. all contain heavy doses of formaldehyde. This is a known carcinogen that is used for embalming people. Both flouride and Aspartame are extremely hard on the immune system. Environmental illness is on a heavy rise, and it is heavily suppressd due to the fact that no company can profit from heavy capitolism caused illnsees. One must virtually live like a cave man to recover, with natural medicine; this equals little profit. The pharmaceutical industry makes billions of dollars from both of these products and everyone should know neither one of these are in their best interest.

    In all actuality, there are much cheaper, safer substances to use that the public is left privey to.

    We deal with people who are environmentally ill every day. They complain of of frequent headaches, short-term memory, acid reflux, sinus problems, digestive problems, muscle pain and breathing difficulties. Most prescription drugs only address the symptoms, not treat the illness. Again, a toxic society cannot heal from chemicals, and little money is to be made elsewhere. Be careful what you put in your body. . . And the air you breathe. You might be shocked at what you see. We prefer to find solutions.

    Kindest regards,
    Susan
    Mold Help Organization
    http://www.mold-help.org

  21. Bunny

    OK, first of all you shouldnt be using any crest products in the first place becuase they all contain flouride. that should be the main issue here. read up on flouride hint: it does not protect you from cavities. on the other note, glycerin is junk, just avoid it

  22. Wendy Webber

    Hi all,
    A big thank you to everyone for their comments here. I have found this very helpful. I’m not personally vegetarian and I kind of stumbled across this site. I sell certified organic products and was googling doing some research on glycerol, an ingredient in many so called natural products. Together you have completely convinced me to avoid this product and once again I am reminded how even so called “natural” products can contain petro-chemical sourced ingredients.

    So I big thank you and wish you all the best in your various pursuits, be it avoiding allergens, animal products, animal testing and the like.

  23. Peter B.

    I also am allergic to glycerin applied externally, but have not noticed an internal response. Possibly my digestive juices neutralize its action. Certainly it’s not as extreme as some of the reports in the blog. If something is going on internally it hasn’t stopped me in my tracks. But I do get red blotches and a general red penetrating irritation from glycerin soaps and toothpastes (including Tom’s) and lotions. Glycerin-free products do exist. Read those labels. Just keep looking.

    This blog which I happened on by typing glycerin allergy into google’s search engine has given me my first contact with fellow glycerin allergy sufferers. I see that my case, while inconvenient, is very mild.

  24. Anya

    to Lila (and others in search of glycerin-free products) —

    my doctor initially told me that i should avoid glycerin/glyceryl/glycerol/glycol/peg, but I’ve been searching on the internet since then, and it seems that glycol doesn’t really fall into this category…

    down below is what i heard on this subject from “Dear Paula” — “Glyceryl ingredients are esters of glycerin. Esters are new compounds formed by the reaction of fatty alcohols and an acid.
    I am not 100% certain a glyceryl ingredient would be problematic for you. Best to check with your physician. Glycols and PEGS (Polyethylene
    glycol) are not related to glycerin, and can be used.”

    i’ve been trying to avoid glycols and pegs anyway, but the choices are very limited… most of the time i just make sure pegs and glycols are at the very bottom of the ingredient list (which means there’s only a little of them in a product).

    here are some things i’ve been using successfully —

    Pure & Basic natural bath and body lotion

    Biogenol shampoo by Framesi — has glycol, but is advertised as “glycerin-free”

    Nature’s Gate Herbal Keratin Shampoo

    Burt’s Bees Almond Milk Hand Cream

    Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion — has glycol, but no glycerin

    Biore Shine Control foaming cleanser — has glycol at the bottom of the list

    Ivory Liquid Hand Soap

    a lot of times similar products by the same company will have glycerin in them. for example, clinique dramatically different moisturizing gel has glycerin in it, and lotion doesn’t… nature’s gate conditioner has glycerin, and shampoo doesn’t… it’s best to read all the ingredients carefully and not just to assume this product won’t have glycerin because a similar product didn’t…

    i hope this helps…

    p.s. i don’t know anything about the above mentioned brands’ animal testing policy, so please forgive me if i have hurt your feelings by mentioning them. my only goal was to help those with glycerin allergies. thanks for understanding!

  25. Anya

    p.p.s. i forgot to mention that the products i listed above are also soy-free (i am allergic to soy). there are many more products out there that are glycerin-free, but not soy-free… good luck in your search!

  26. KMaCK

    THANK GOD !!!
    Not that I want anyone to be ill, but I’ve found a place for other people with reactions to glycerin. I’m also humbled by the fact that my reaction is very mild and more of a nusicance compared to what some of you have.

    Is there any way to create a new thread or archive and move the posts here about ALLERGIC reactions to glycerin to its own location?

    I’m stumped by thing like – a recent medication / liquid I got a Rx for to stop an ear infection has glycerin in it, so the infection never 100% healed – or more like the ear infaction in the pure sense of the word is gone, but now my ears are itchy, sore, flaky and ozing.

    My reactions are very much like Peter B.’s but as mild as that might be, it’s no fun when your head gets big bald patches in it because the hair moisturizer you use has glycerin in it, your lips turn black, burn, itch and peel because of your lip gloss, or your face turns fire engine red, feels like it is on fire, swells up from using Neutragena soap. (That was my very first reaction to glycerine. The one that rung my bell to the fact there was a problem I needed to be very careful of.) But I did learn something from that last experience. My face was BURNING so bad, it really felt like it was on fire. I was home alone and in a panic. Cold water didn’t do anything! My “inner voice” said “You have god liver oil in the refrig.” I don’t know if this would have worked with any oil that was cold (I keep all of my cooking oil in the frig to reduce rancidness) but I went down stairs and slathered on cold cod liver oil and the burn stopped IMMEDIATLY. After about a half hour I notived my swollen skin – actually the top epiderial layer – had gone back down. It peeled off my face in one big sheet. Beautiful skin underneith, but that is one chemical peel I NEVER want to repeat ever again.

    And MUCH thanks and respect to Anya’s warning about not being complacent about brands. I LOVE Nature’s Gate but found out the hard way that many of their hair conditioners have glycerin. No fun haveing a wonderful shampoo session in the shower, put in the conditioner and start to feel that tale tell glycerin burn all in your scalp. *&^%$@$^

    I’d like to see what keep are learning about glycerin free products. I would like to know if anyone knows how to make soap – soap that is 100% free from glycerin. Thnings like that.

    Thanks and good luck.

  27. Sergio

    I am so happy I found this discussion. I have been suspecting that I might be intolerant to glycols. The medications I use (topical steroids) all have them.

    This I know for sure: I cannot use any kind of conditioner. My scalp goes nuts! I have to be careful with shampoos. Alternating them seems to work better. Could it be that my scalp gets used to one and when I go back to another, there may be a respite before it recognizes the “element” and then gives me a hard time?

    What are some of the features/characteristics of the rashes people get on the face? Can you describe these for me? I have been diagnosed with psoriasis – but I don’t have lesions elsewhere on my body other than my face/scalp. When I stop using soap on my groin, the itch is no longer there.

    I recently started using Grandpa’s Pine Tar soap. It worked beuatiful the first few days – and without my having to use medication for the rash. I see my rash coming back again. And the ingredients in that soap are pretty simple: coconut oil, palm oil, Vegetable glycerin, and pine tree extract. I also used the Oatmeal soap (which does not have the pine extract) and I found the rash remained. Could it be that my skin just realized that this soap contains glycerin and therefore is a no/no?

    I will ask my dermatologist for a glycerin test. And like one of the posters here, I am fatigued after years of going through this mysterious rash.

  28. Sergio

    I am so happy I found this discussion. I have been suspecting that I might be intolerant to glycols. The medications I use (topical steroids) all have them.

    This I know for sure: I cannot use any kind of conditioner. My scalp goes nuts! I have to be careful with shampoos. Alternating them seems to work better. Could it be that my scalp gets used to one and when I go back to another, there may be a respite before it recognizes the “element” and then gives me a hard time?

    What are some of the features/characteristics of the rashes people get on the face? Can you describe these for me? I have been diagnosed with psoriasis – but I don’t have lesions elsewhere on my body other than my face/scalp. When I stop using soap on my groin, the itch is no longer there.

    I recently started using Grandpa’s Pine Tar soap. It worked beuatiful the first few days – and without my having to use medication for the rash. I see my rash coming back again. And the ingredients in that soap are pretty simple: coconut oil, palm oil, Vegetable glycerin, and pine tree extract. I also used the Oatmeal soap (which does not have the pine extract) and I found the rash remained. Could it be that my skin just realized that this soap contains glycerin and therefore is a no/no?

    I will ask my dermatologist for a glycerin test. And like one of the posters here, I am fatigued after years of going through this mysterious rash.

  29. Veronika

    I am also allergic to glycerine on my face, where my skin is most sensitive. My reaction is dry, flaky, itchy skin…i’ve done several controls, like not putting anything else on my face except facewash that had glycerine, and sure enough i reacted. when i switched, my face cleared.

    I stopped wearing makeup and i don’t use any harsh medications (for acne) on my face anymore. For facewash i use Neutragena Oil-free acne wash (my only discontent is the propelyne glycol).

    There are two lotions i’m trying out: Dr. Hauschka Rose Day Cream (extremely overpriced, but feels lovely) and Aubrey Organics Blue Green Algea moisturizer. These same brands have other lotion products that have glycerine, so read the label carefully.

    Bath and Body Works also has a line called Pure Simplicity with almond face scrub. This doesn’t have glycerine, but it does have parabens. There is also a Rice face wash and Milk Thistle cream wash that i’ve used in the past, but i’m not sure if i stopped using them because they had glycerine or propelyne glycol.

    P.S. It seems that J missed the point about why we would stay away from chemicals that are derived from animal products. It is not that there is something evil about the chemical glycerine, since he points out that it has the same chemical structure as the chemical in plants; it is the difference in THE WAY IT IS DERIVED. To get animal glycerine, ANIMALS MUST BE SLAUGHTERED. If companies don’t buy animal glycerine (persuaded by the conumer who will not buy the products until they switch) and wait until vegetable glycerine was available, fewer animals would be “processed” and more vegetable glycerine would have to be made.

  30. Jen

    I seem to have stumbled upon this site like many of you: by googling “glycerin allergy”. I just had one of the worst reactions to a product line EVER. L’Occitane prides itself on its “grassroots/totally natural/no animal testing” philosophy. Although I’ve known for ages that just because a label says “natural” it doesn’t mean the product’s safe, I put my trust in this company and am paying the price with a rash from head to toe. Just thought I’d share the info so you can avoid making the same mistake.

  31. britta

    in response to cecilia’s question regarding face moisturizers that do not contain glycerine… i’ve recently started usinf organic coconut oil as a moisturiser ( my skin freaks out from just about anyting i put on it)… this differs from the cooking oil – there is a variety that is for skin and hair… it’s made from young, virgin coconuts and is not as “greasy”as the cooking oil. it’s even great under makeup! another benefit is that it acts as a gentle exfoliant so it makes your skin SUPER soft. put a small amount in your hands and rub together until it has liquefied and apply to damp/wet skin.
    good luck!!!!

  32. saadullah

    dear sir,
    i need the literature relating to the reactions of glycerin with hydrogen chloride gas/HCl acid in the presence of catalyst.
    thanks

  33. Rochelle

    Hi,

    Thanks for writing!

    Caress, Lever 2000, and Dove Ultra Moisturizing Body Washes do not
    contain animal matter. The glycerin in the product is not of animal
    origin.

    Any products containing the following ingredients may have animal by
    products. Please check the ingredient label.

    Glycerin – Is either natural or synthetic

    Stearic Acid comes from Beef Tallow

    Lanolin Alcohol is derived from animal matter

    Oleic Acid – Derived from animal (beef or pork)

    We hope this information is helpful!
    Your friends at Unilever HPC
    doveusa

  34. mahad

    can someone post how glycerin come from? And how is it produced?

    Thanks

  35. Rebeca

    That sucks! I guess I just won’t eat anything that has glycerine if I am not sure where it come from.

  36. Christina

    I, like many of you, stumbled on this site. My daughter is allergic to soy. While researching soy allergies, I dicovered that glcerin can be made from soy and thought that the two were related. Now I realize that they may be separate allergies since glycerin can also be made from animal sources. Thanks for the insight.

    Her allergic reactions are mild, thankfully, but nontheless annoying. Now I don’t feel foolish reading toothpaste tubes in the grocery store.

  37. Linda

    I also stumbled onto this site while doing some research into glycerin.

    I have found a 100% Olive Oil soap which does not contain glycerin – or anything else except olive oil, for that matter. I recently received a sample of it from the Natural Products Expo in Anaheim, California, and I really love it.

    This soap is great and the label says it is “fair-trade, completely biodegradable, organic and never tested on animals.” It does not “over-wash” my skin, thereby depleting it of all its natural moisture.

    FYI, the company I received the sample from is Armstrong Skin Aid. They have a website, (www.armstrongskinaid.com) if anyone is interested.

  38. Debora

    Hiall,
    I stumbled across this site when I was googling about vegetable glycerin. It is in a toothpaste product that my friend thinks is a top quality, all natural product. I wanted to check it out for myself to learn more about what it is. I’m not convinced that it’s okay. It surprised me when I heard that people are allergic to glycerin. I should know that people can be allergic to just about anything. One product that I love that is free of flouride and glycerin is Tooth Soap. It is an alternative to toothpaste but a lot better because it doesn’t contain any harmful products, makes your mouth cleaner, and reduces gum pocket and sensitivities. I would recommend it to anyone and everyone. For anyone who thinks flouride is okay, it’s not. It is just another harmful thing that professional like dentist report as being a good thing. Read about what they don’t tell you in studies that have proven that flouride doesn’t help with cavities an is harmful to the body.

  39. prime

    Quaker 100% natural granola oats honey and raisins has glycerin in it is it safe to eat?

  40. LaSondra

    Wayne is not the only one suffering from an allergen to glycerin, unfortunately I suffer from the same thing. It took many test before my ENT doctor finally figured it out and he also was stunned and usure of where to go. However with his experience they were able to remove the glycerin from my allergy injections. I’m sickly all the time, and now I understand why!

  41. tim

    i am just currious as to why there are so many animal rights activists willing to unaturaly alter their diet just to avoid any possible herm to an animal and why there are no plant rights activists?
    if you can say that unfair treatment of animals is grounds for not consuming or useing any animal product or basicly anything ever tuched by an animal, why does no one see slaughtering millions of helpless plants a day and eating them as cruel or cutting the lawn as wantonly killing of peaceful harmless plants?
    if you are going to give so much care and consideration to animals that should also extend to all living things, including plans and bacteria, speeking of that, you ever wonder why bread rises, its because there are millions of little living things (commonly known as yeast) in there that give off a gass as a by product. when that bread is cooked those living organizims are killed. so next time you are about to boil water to cook some of your organic vegtibles just remember the millions of bacteria you are killing outnumber the chicken you could be eating by alot more than you could ever count to

  42. Ryan

    i am just currious as to why there are so many animal rights activists willing to unaturaly alter their diet just to avoid any possible herm to an animal and why there are no plant rights activists?

    GOOD FREAKIN’ GOD. Are there really still people that say things like this?

    Let’s make it simple once and for all and then get back to glycerin:

    1. Plants don’t feel pain.

    2. You’re not serious anyway.

    3. And if you are serious about “plant rights,” far more plants are killed in the food made for food animals. So a plant-based diet is still the “least harm.”

    Thank you, now please go away.

  43. tim

    another note along the same lines, the refusal to use an animal product because it could mean the unethical treetment of animals is very interestin to me, mostly because human beings are also an animal, why does no one refuse to eat or use anything thats man made, on the grounds that there may have been some unetical treatment of humans along the way?

  44. tim

    hey ryan, who says plants cant feel?

  45. Ryan

    why does no one refuse to eat or use anything thats man made, on the grounds that there may have been some unetical treatment of humans along the way?

    Next time someone’s child is killed because a pair of synthetic shoes are made, let me know. (Look up the veal/milk connection for this reference.)

    Animals don’t give permission or asked to be used. Humans make things and don’t suffer for them.

    And when they do (a la sweatshops) then, no, we shouldn’t buy them.

    hey ryan, who says plants cant feel?

    To recount a comment I made elsewhere on the blog:

    Plants don’t have a central nervous system and so are unable to feel pain. There was a “theory” back in the 1970s that plants could feel pain, but it was quickly debunked. Questions 42-45 of this FAQ go into far more detail than I will here.

  46. tim

    ok back to glycerin, do any of you refuse to drive trough tunnels?
    because they are most likely blased using dynomite which is also known as nitroglycerin, ahich like many of the products you are discussing is manufactued from plant and animal based glycerin

  47. tim

    what about bee hunny?
    they arent hurt in the production and if done right they arent hurt in removing it from the comb either

  48. tim

    what about bee hunny?
    if done right they arent hurt either
    and saying humans arent hurt to produce things, have you ever seen people picking bananas in equado for nearly nothing just to survive

  49. Ryan

    That’s what I figured it would come to.

    No, one cannot live their lives without negatively affecting animals, the environment, or other people in some way. That’s just the way it is. But to take that and say, “Bah, then I might as well not do anything” is pretty lame, especially when it’s so easy to make a big difference by doing little things (not eating meat, not driving a heavy duty gas guzzler, etc.).

    Not to mention the allergic reactions some people have.

    So why’s it matter to you so much?

  50. Ryan

    OK, I’m closing the comments out on this since it’s gotten off topic.

    If you’re genuinely interested in any of these questions you’re asking (which have nothing to do with glycerin), look around the site. They’ve all been answered countless times. Or look over the aforementioned AR FAQ. It’s all in there.

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